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» » Schubert - Boston Symphony, Munch - Symphony In C Major "The Great"
Schubert - Boston Symphony, Munch - Symphony In C Major "The Great" flac album
Title:

Schubert - Boston Symphony, Munch - Symphony In C Major "The Great" flac album

Performer:
Album:
Symphony In C Major "The Great"
Country:
Genre:
MP3 archive size:
1355 mb
FLAC archive size:
1371 mb
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
892

Tracklist

A1 I. Andante: Allegro Ma Non Troppo 14:40
A2 II. Andante Con Moto 15:05
B1 III. Scherzo: Allegro Vivace 9:55
B2 IV. Finale: Allegro Vivace 12:25

Companies, etc.

  • Produced At – TELDEC »Telefunken-Decca« Schallplatten GmbH

Credits

  • Composed By – Schubert*
  • Conductor – Charles Munch
  • Musical Director – Richard Mohr
  • Recording Engineer – Lewis Layton

Notes

This version has german, english and french liner notes under RCA red seal with typical red labels and varying cat, produced at germ TELDEC.

Other versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
LSC-2344 Schubert* - Boston Symphony Orchestra, Charles Munch Schubert* - Boston Symphony Orchestra, Charles Munch - Symphony In C Major "The Great" ‎(LP, Ind) RCA Victor Red Seal LSC-2344 US 1959
CCV 5054 Schubert* / Boston Symphony Orchestra, Charles Munch Schubert* / Boston Symphony Orchestra, Charles Munch - Symphony No.9 In C Major "The Great" ‎(LP, Album) Camden Classics Victrola CCV 5054 UK Unknown
DRL1-0072 Schubert* - Boston Symphony Orchestra, Charles Munch Schubert* - Boston Symphony Orchestra, Charles Munch - Symphony No. 9 ("The Great") ‎(LP, RE, Ind) RCA DRL1-0072 US 1973
KVS 83 Schubert* / Charles Munch / Orchestre Symphonique De Boston* Schubert* / Charles Munch / Orchestre Symphonique De Boston* - Sinfonia "La Grande" N. 9 In Do Maggiore ‎(LP) RCA Victrola KVS 83 Italy Unknown
RR 6073-M, RR-6073 Schubert*, Bostoner Symphonie-Orchester*, Charles Münch* Schubert*, Bostoner Symphonie-Orchester*, Charles Münch* - Symphonie In C-Dur „Die Große“ ‎(LP, Club) RCA Red Seal, Das Beste Reader's Digest, RCA Red Seal, Das Beste Reader's Digest RR 6073-M, RR-6073 Germany Unknown

Schubert - Boston Symphony Orchestra, Charles Munch - Symphony In C Major "The Great" ‎(LP, Ind). Schubert, Boston Symphony Orchestra, Charles Munch. Schubert, Boston Symphony Orchestra, Charles Munch - Symphony N. In C Major "The Great" ‎(LP, Album). Camden Classics Victrola.

The Symphony No. 9 in C major, D 944, known as the Great (first published by Breitkopf & Härtel in 1849 as "Symphonie, C Dur, für großes Orchester", listed as Symphony No. 8 in the Neue Schubert-Ausgabe), is the final symphony completed by Franz Schubert. Originally called The Great C major to distinguish it from his Symphony No. 6, the Little C major, the subtitle is now usually taken as a reference to the symphony's majesty

Schubert - Boston Symphony Orchestra, Charles Munch - Symphony In C Major "The Great" ‎(LP, Ind).

Recorded in 1955 and 1958, respectively, these performances with the phenomenal Boston Symphony Orchestra sound magnificent with the spacious separation and the close simulation of a real orchestral environment made possible by remastering. Beyond the superb audio quality, these recordings are fascinating documents of Münch's elegant interpretations of Schubert. Known mostly as a conductor of the French Romantic repertoire, Münch was less closely associated with the Austro-Germanic symphonic literature, so his Schubert might seem a little outside the tradition, especially because of his. Boston Symphony Orchestra Charles Munch, conductor. Recorded in February 1955 and November 1958). Digitally remastered.

Symphony No. 9 in C Major, D. 944, "The Great": IV. Finale. Heinz Holliger, Kammerorchester Basel, Франц Шуберт. Symphony No. 944, "The Great": III. Scherzo. Allegro vivace - Trio. 944, "The Great": II. Andante con moto. 944, "The Great": I. Andante - Allegro ma non troppo.

This was The Great C major, written during 1825-1826 (rather than 1828 as was supposed until quite recently), and thus is the allegedly lost "Gastein" Symphony. C major yields to A major in the trio, with its broader tune for winds, before the song-sonata repeats. Allegro vivace, again in C, this finale begins with a churning subject in triplet rhythm that stubbornly fights resolution (it is the grandest and most famous compositional trap in all music). Schubert finally must stop before he can introduce a new theme on clarinets and horns.

Munch's conception of the C major Symphony is similar to Toscanini's 1953 recording: the first movement is played with little tempo fluctuation; the second movement is an Andante rather than a quasi-Adagio; the final movements are rollicking. In addition, repeats are not observed. But numerous details are different, including forward winds and brass, and less prominent strings. Munch gets a mellow tone from his orchestra, until he lets the brass blast forth at climaxes. In short, this is the polar opposite of the Gemutlikeit style favored in many performances.

You will find this symphony, the last one Schubert completed, sometimes called his Eighth and sometimes his Ninth, most frequently the latter. You may even run across an old recording that calls it his Seventh or stumble across mention of it as his Tenth. The simple answer for this confusing situation is that not a single one of Schubert’s symphonies was published during his lifetime-nor, apart from the piece at hand, until more than half a century after his death.